About

“Have nothing to do with the fruitless works of darkness,” St. Paul writes. “Rather, expose them.” (Ephesians 5:11)

Cy-Fair Parents Care (CFPC) started in 2012 after the Cypress Fairbanks (Cy-Fair) Independent School District wanted to implement a “Comprehensive Sex Ed” (CSE) curriculum.  Parents joined together to petition the district to drop the “It’s Your Game”  CSE program.  Thanks to Senator Dan Patrick and C.F.I.S.D. Superintendent Mark Henry the program was finally ended effectively on 10/17/2012.  Never let it be said that one person cannot make a difference!

CFPC hopes to help the C.F.I.S.D. community with not only a “Sexual Risk Avoidance” program but community wide programs to assist students, parents and families with a variety of topics to help foster relationships, trust and healthy choices.  We cannot do this alone, it will take all of us standing up for our community in order to save it and protect it.  Get involved. Pray about how you will serve. Many are needed to volunteer for C.F.I.S.D., take classes on relationships and mentoring students, serve on the Student Health Advisory Council (or LSHAC), the Superintendent’s Council or other district committees.

Email us at cyfairparentscare@yahoo.com

What Cy-Fair Parents Care are for

  1. Sexual Risk Avoidance Curriculum – rewarding students by learning to set goals, make decisions and understand human reproduction, along with the risks and consequences of premature sexual activity.[1] Schools must follow the Texas State Guidelines that state, “direct adolescents to a standard of behavior in which abstinence from sexual activity before marriage is the most effective way to prevent pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, and infection with human immunodeficiency virus or acquired immune deficiency syndrome”.
  2. Programs that are Age Appropriate – human reproduction information that is geared to middle schoolers[2] 6-8 grade (11-14 years old) and then geared to high schoolers grades 9-12 (14-19 years old) in regards to the degree of information disclosed with accuracy and respect.[3]
  3. Survey to Assess those At Risk – students with a “boyfriend” or “girlfriend” are at a higher odds 2.1 and 2.9 respectively for initiating sex earlier, and also if the boyfriend/girlfriend is 2 years or e older than the student were 2.1 times more likely to have sex.[4] Other factors could be family dynamics, socio-economic status or English as a second language. It is our responsibility to find out who is at risk and help them.
  4. Mandatory Parent Meeting and Participation – children for the most part, will do what is expected of them. Parents need to understand how their children are being influenced by unhealthy behaviors from the media and entertainment industries and even in public school depending on the curriculum or even personal opinions. We must help parents to discern what would be in alignment with their own values, many feel ill equipped to cover a hot topic such as abstinence and sexual education.  We would offer help to parents to create family guidelines; thus helping their students to understand the benefits of following those values and guidelines.[5] It has been shown that Dad is an important part of talking with teens about sex education.[6]
  5. After School Complementary program – students that are unmonitored are at a higher risk for drugs, alcohol, smoking and sex than those students that have a parent or caregiver at home. Let’s encourage parents to have childcare resources for their students; a program that will also encourage students to make healthy decisions on an ongoing basis and help them improve their grades and confidence. [7]
  6. Adults that can Help – we need a variety of parents, community members, teachers, faith-based community members and healthcare providers to support our students with mentoring, extra-curricular activities, teen struggles and successes and more.[8]
  7. A Solid Program 4-6 years in length – A one or two year program is not enough. Student decision making and risk taking abilities are not fully developed until students are in their mid 20’s.  They must be continually encouraged to learn about their development, how to follow rules, make decisions, set standards and to become leaders. Programs that are multi-year will most likely have the highest success. Let’s find something that we can do for every grade 6-12th.[9]
  8. Quarterly Speakers for Families – parents and students need on-going support in their lives to help them navigate each segment of life. Let’s bring the best and the brightest with experience and encouragement to help Cy-Fair families thrive through the incredibly emotional, spiritual and physical time of adolescence.[10] [11] [12]
  9. Annual Conference to Educate the Community – let’s get the community educated and empowered in connection with the school district and make sure that all parents and students are being helped with dynamic speakers and discussions to help each other understand the issues and the possible solutions of the teenage years. Cy-Fair Parents Care will help to create this.
  10. Follow up and Review of Results – let’s review annually to see where we are; to measure students’ progress, to monitor programs for effectiveness and possible adjustments, to review the community goals, to continue or adjust the program to ensure its success.

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